TechTalkz.com Logo Ask the Experts!

Go Back   TechTalkz.com Technology & Computer Troubleshooting Forums > Tech Support Archives > Hardware > Printers

How to re-ink a dot-matrix printer ribbon ?

Printers

 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Unread 14-11-2007, 02:24 PM   #11
Richard Steinfeld
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: How to re-ink a dot-matrix printer ribbon ?

MCheu wrote:
> On 15 Jun 2006 05:29:02 -0700, "wylbur37" <wylbur37nospam***********>
> wrote:
>
>>Some have said that they've used ordinary stamp-pad ink and it works.
>>But others have said that stamp-pad ink isn't good because
>>(a) it dries out too quickly and (b) it doesn't have the lubricating
>>ingredients that a printhead needs. Have you tried it?

>


Not only that, but there's the matter of the stench of stamp pad ink. It
smells so foul, gets me so pissed off that the first thing that I want
to do is track down a troll and punch him out real good. Real good. So,
if you don't want me to get my hands on that troll and punch him out
real good, don't send him 'round with no stamp pad ink for my printer,
do you hear me?

>
>>And what about the possibility of making your own ink?
>>Does anyone know the recipe for dot-matrix printer ribbon ink?

>
>
> Nope, sorry. In the old days, it was claimed that the main components
> of black ribbon ink were light mineral oil and carbon dust. The thing
> is, I don't know the specifics like: granularity of the carbon (it'd
> have to be fine, but I don't know how fine), the ratio of carbon to
> oil, and whatever other ingredients were added to thin the stuff out
> and preserve it. The mineral oil you see in drug stores and hardware
> stores might be too thick for this. Anyways, I wouldn't recommend
> homebrew ink. You'll definitely run into problems if you don't get
> the mix right.
>


My father, an artist, didn't like being charged so much for art
materials. This included India Ink (tm), which he felt was a ripoff (it
was). So, he decided to make his own. He dug up a recipe at the
marvelous New York Public Library, and went at it on the kitchen stove.
The instructions were similar to witch's brew ("...eye of toad, wing of
bat, toenails of a newt..."). The resulting product was a vat of foul
brown swill -- he had made a few gallons of this, and presented me with
a couple of quarts.

Maybe it would be good in an inkjet printer...

However, now that I think about it, I'd much rather just punch out that
troll. How do I find the bastard? He's asked for it: I want to punch him
out real good.

Richard
 
Unread 14-11-2007, 02:24 PM   #12
George E. Cawthon
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: How to re-ink a dot-matrix printer ribbon ?

Richard Steinfeld wrote:
((Snipped)
>>
>> First it would help if you spelled the most important word correctly.
>> It is "silicone" which is entirely different from silicon which is an
>> element.
>>

>
> Jeesh.
> So sorry to have offended you, George. I admit that I get them mixed up
> sometimes. I'm groveling. As I recall, "Silicone" is a brand name, which
> is why I use the generic. Check it out.


You didn't offend me since I don't take your or
anyone else's misinformation personally. I was
just pointing out a rather common error which
generally means that the person may have much less
knowledge than they profess.

Your recollection is rather faulty, silicone is
not a brand name. Suggest you use a dictionary to
find out what it means instead of recall.
>
>> Second, silicone lubricants weren't generally available when dot
>> matrix printers became available. So although later dot matrix
>> ribbons may use silicone, those commonly available in the early 80's
>> and earlier wouldn't have use silicone.
>>

> You talk so emphatically, I was doubting myself there for a moment; then
> I recalled that I was using such lubricants in the repair shop at that
> time; why I've even got a couple of cans and tubes in my workshop that I
> acquired in the year 1984. It would help if you got your facts right. In
> fact, a silicon spray lube was used on my car at a Mobil-owned garage in
> the year 1971! The oil company had built the place and was building the
> business in preparation for selling it to a franchisee or independent
> operator; they were well-equipped with house-brand products.


Emphatic? I don't think so. Notice I said
"weren't generally available" not "were not
available." Reminds me that I saw a microwave
oven demonstrated in '54 or '55. But I know they
were uncommon in households for at least the next
10 years and didn't become fairly common in
households until the late 70's.

>
>> Third, WD 40 was a common substance used to rejuvenate dot matrix
>> ribbons by home hobbyists in the 80's. Spraying the head with WD 40
>> was a common practice and highly effective practice to clean the
>> head. I can tell you from personal experience that WD 40 most
>> definitely wets a dot matrix ribbon and dissolves the dried ink and
>> cleans the head. Does the same for typewriter ribbons. However,
>> getting a ribbon with a consistent "wetting" so that it prints a
>> consistent darkness is very difficult.

>
> I'd rather use silicon fluid, with which I have confidence from
> experience. WD-40 has a reputation for getting rather nasty with age
> (check alt.antiques.radio+phono and other sources). On the other hand,
> maybe you know something that I don't.


"Rather" all you want, WD-40 was the commonly
recommended home product for reconditioning a
printer ribbon among computer hobbyists. Note
that I indicated that it didn't work well for me.
Apparently I do know something that you don't.

>
> As far as glycerine goes, that's what my father was using to get more
> mileage from his typewriter ribbons during the 50s.


Is this an argument, since I never mentioned
glycerin. Never heard of anyone doing anything
more than buying a new ribbon, since they lasted
so long and were relatively cheap. For home use,
the major reason for changing ribbons was that
they frayed or had holes punched in them at the ends.
>
>> Finally, There are still many high speed dot matrix printers for
>> special jobs, so buying ink should not be difficult if one looks for
>> commercial vendors.
>>

>
> Geesh, George; that was a pretty troll-esque opening. I'd prefer better
> manners if we're going to get so close and personal.


Never fear, we aren't going to get close and
personal. I prefer to remain objective, even if
it requires bluntness.

> Ricard

 
Unread 14-11-2007, 02:24 PM   #13
George E. Cawthon
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: How to re-ink a dot-matrix printer ribbon ?

MCheu wrote:
> On 15 Jun 2006 05:29:02 -0700, "wylbur37" <wylbur37nospam***********>
> wrote:
>
>> For those who still use a dot-matrix printer, getting replacemant
>> ribbons is becoming more difficult.
>>
>> An alternative is to purchase ink designed to re-ink the ribbon
>> cartridge, but even that is not easy to find.
>>
>> Some have said that they've used ordinary stamp-pad ink and it works.
>> But others have said that stamp-pad ink isn't good because
>> (a) it dries out too quickly and (b) it doesn't have the lubricating
>> ingredients that a printhead needs. Have you tried it?

>
> It's not good for dot matrix ribbons. The stamp pad ink is alcohol
> and water based. It "might" work short term, but only because the
> alcohol may redistribute the oil in the ribbon before it evaporates.
> Since the printhead uses metal striker pins to create your printout,
> you probably don't want to expose those to water.
>
> The Ink on a dot matrix ribbon uses an oil for the solvent. One of
> the tricks we used to use in the C64 days to extend the life of a
> ribbon was to open the ribbon cartridge, and spray the ribbon with
> WD40. Often times, it wasn't so much that the ink on the ribbon had
> run out but that the solvent/lubricant had dried out. It also helped
> redistribute some of the particulate components back to the middle of
> the ribbon. It was usually enough to give you a few weeks more
> service out of a cartridge until you had time to go shopping for a
> replacement.
>
>> And what about the possibility of making your own ink?
>> Does anyone know the recipe for dot-matrix printer ribbon ink?

>
> Nope, sorry. In the old days, it was claimed that the main components
> of black ribbon ink were light mineral oil and carbon dust. The thing
> is, I don't know the specifics like: granularity of the carbon (it'd
> have to be fine, but I don't know how fine), the ratio of carbon to
> oil, and whatever other ingredients were added to thin the stuff out
> and preserve it. The mineral oil you see in drug stores and hardware
> stores might be too thick for this. Anyways, I wouldn't recommend
> homebrew ink. You'll definitely run into problems if you don't get
> the mix right.
>
> Also, re-inking a ribbon isn't as easy as refilling an ink cartridge
> or just dabbing the ribbon with ink. If you've ever opened one of
> those cartridges, you'll know that there's typically several feet of
> ribbon stuffed inside the cartridge body in accordion fashion. You'll
> need an inking machine for that, as doing it by hand is ridiculously
> messy and time consuming.
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thanks.
>
>
> MCheu


A man who knows what he is talking about!
 
Unread 14-11-2007, 02:25 PM   #14
Arthur Entlich
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: How to re-ink a dot-matrix printer ribbon ?


Richard,

George seems easily offended, best to ignore it (and often him ;-))
However, on rare occasions he is correct (as well as right (as in
right-wing)) ;-)

Silicon is the element Si

Silicone is a polymer usually made of silicon and oxygen atoms, and used
in adhesives, lubricants and insulators.

Art


Richard Steinfeld wrote:

> George E. Cawthon wrote:
>


>>
>> First it would help if you spelled the most important word correctly.
>> It is "silicone" which is entirely different from silicon which is an
>> element.
>>

>
> Jeesh.
> So sorry to have offended you, George. I admit that I get them mixed up
> sometimes. I'm groveling. As I recall, "Silicone" is a brand name, which
> is why I use the generic. Check it out.
>

 
Unread 14-11-2007, 02:25 PM   #15
George E. Cawthon
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: How to re-ink a dot-matrix printer ribbon ?

Arthur Entlich wrote:
>
> Richard,
>
> George seems easily offended, best to ignore it (and often him ;-))
> However, on rare occasions he is correct (as well as right (as in
> right-wing)) ;-)


Oh thank you Art!

> Silicon is the element Si
>
> Silicone is a polymer usually made of silicon and oxygen atoms, and used
> in adhesives, lubricants and insulators.



>
> Art
>
>
> Richard Steinfeld wrote:
>
>> George E. Cawthon wrote:
>>

>
>>>
>>> First it would help if you spelled the most important word
>>> correctly. It is "silicone" which is entirely different from silicon
>>> which is an element.
>>>

>>
>> Jeesh.
>> So sorry to have offended you, George. I admit that I get them mixed
>> up sometimes. I'm groveling. As I recall, "Silicone" is a brand name,
>> which is why I use the generic. Check it out.
>>

 
Unread 14-11-2007, 02:25 PM   #16
Richard Steinfeld
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: How to re-ink a dot-matrix printer ribbon ?

Arthur Entlich wrote:
>
> Richard,
>
> George seems easily offended, best to ignore it (and often him ;-))
> However, on rare occasions he is correct (as well as right (as in
> right-wing)) ;-)
>
> Silicon is the element Si
>
> Silicone is a polymer usually made of silicon and oxygen atoms, and used
> in adhesives, lubricants and insulators.
>
> Art
>


Yeah. I know. I got the outraged self-righteousness. I've got better
things to do than get into a pissing contest with him. He was right
about "silicone."

It would be interesting to try some silicon(e) fluid on my son's
Panasonic dot matrix printer. When it was new, I cured its sticking pins
with silicone fluid. Now, I don't know exactly which one to use; I've
still got a collection of at least 11 different viscosities of silicone
fluid, plus a few silicone greases (all from the mid-80s when George
says it didn't exist).

I got most of this stuff for experimenting with viscous-damped
high-quality phono tonearms. The damping fluid is used to stabilize the
arm/cartridge.

It would be cool to smear silicone fluid on the Panasonic's ribbon. The
only problem is that Panasonic was an early practitioner of the
"consumables racket." Consumer Reports could be counted on to fall for
that one (I wonder if they still do). The ribbons are incredibly short
and thin, so you go through them at a rapid clip -- there was no
dispensation about price, either. Typically, when you got the bright
idea to have a go at re-inking the ribbon, the damn thing was beginning
to shred. Epson would have been a better investment, but there was a
certain matter about the shrieking noise (remember?).

About the dot printer: it feels like a sturdy old friend; I can't bear
(bare) to throw it out. But then, I've still got that Olympia (Nakajima)
interfaced typewriter. It's a beaut (sigh!).

Thanks for the comment.

Richard
 
Unread 14-11-2007, 02:25 PM   #17
drc023
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: How to re-ink a dot-matrix printer ribbon ?

Computer Friends in Portland, Oregon - www.cfriends.com has been selling
dot matrix reinking supplies since the 1980's. A small bottle will last a
very, very long time.
--
Ron

"wylbur37" <wylbur37nospam***********> wrote in message
news:1150374542.235628.171290@r2g2000cwb.googlegro ups.com...
> For those who still use a dot-matrix printer, getting replacemant
> ribbons is becoming more difficult.
>
> An alternative is to purchase ink designed to re-ink the ribbon
> cartridge, but even that is not easy to find.
>
> Some have said that they've used ordinary stamp-pad ink and it works.
> But others have said that stamp-pad ink isn't good because
> (a) it dries out too quickly and (b) it doesn't have the lubricating
> ingredients that a printhead needs. Have you tried it?
>
> And what about the possibility of making your own ink?
> Does anyone know the recipe for dot-matrix printer ribbon ink?
>
> ...
>



 
Unread 14-11-2007, 02:26 PM   #18
George E. Cawthon
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: How to re-ink a dot-matrix printer ribbon ?

Richard Steinfeld wrote:
> Arthur Entlich wrote:
>>
>> Richard,
>>
>> George seems easily offended, best to ignore it (and often him ;-))
>> However, on rare occasions he is correct (as well as right (as in
>> right-wing)) ;-)
>>
>> Silicon is the element Si
>>
>> Silicone is a polymer usually made of silicon and oxygen atoms, and
>> used in adhesives, lubricants and insulators.
>>
>> Art
>>

>
> Yeah. I know. I got the outraged self-righteousness. I've got better
> things to do than get into a pissing contest with him. He was right
> about "silicone."
>
> It would be interesting to try some silicon(e) fluid on my son's
> Panasonic dot matrix printer. When it was new, I cured its sticking pins
> with silicone fluid. Now, I don't know exactly which one to use; I've
> still got a collection of at least 11 different viscosities of silicone
> fluid, plus a few silicone greases (all from the mid-80s when George
> says it didn't exist).
>
>
> Richard


Hi Richard:

Have a drink, relax, increase your reading skills
and think before you give advice where you have
very limited knowledge.

At least you admitted you were wrong about
silicone/silicon. I never said silicone products
didn't exist in the mid 80's, I said that before
the mid 80's they weren't common. Silicone
products were around in the 50's but they were not
for the consumer market, they were for specialized
markets, one was the electrical/electronic industry.

For your information, I used RTV silicone,
polymerizing product, to attach metal to glass in
1973, so I would never say it didn't exist in the
mid-80s, but it was ordered through scientific
supplies because it was primarily for the
scientific and electronics market. Starting in
the 80's silicone products became a fad with
silicone oils, caulks, cements, etc. The old RTV
silicone was put in the mass market, colored, and
packaged for numerous uses and names but was
essentially the same product.
 
Unread 14-11-2007, 02:26 PM   #19
Arthur Entlich
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: How to re-ink a dot-matrix printer ribbon ?

Oh yes, I certainly recall the silicone greases used for damping tone
arms on turn tables. Still have some of that goop around here
somewhere, and never was able to get my DUal tone arm to drop at just
the right speed ;-)

I also owned a number of Panasonic/Roland dot matrix printers, and
overall they were pretty reliable machines. I remember buying 3rd party
ribbons back then (the Panasonics were like $22 each up in Canada), but
the problem was the cheaper ones would get all distorted from the
printer pins and then they would hit the paper and smear. Also the darn
weld would fail after a few reinkings, which the originals tended to
hold together much better. I think I still have a case of the ribbons
somewhere here. I tried all sorts of reinking methods from the WD 40
approach to buying a bottle of ink and making a mess trying to
distribute it to the ribbon.

The ones I used had a small reinking wheel in them, and I finally
figured the best approach was to just when it with ink and allow the
ribbon to get reinked from it.

Art


Richard Steinfeld wrote:

>
> It would be interesting to try some silicon(e) fluid on my son's
> Panasonic dot matrix printer. When it was new, I cured its sticking pins
> with silicone fluid. Now, I don't know exactly which one to use; I've
> still got a collection of at least 11 different viscosities of silicone
> fluid, plus a few silicone greases (all from the mid-80s when George
> says it didn't exist).
>
> I got most of this stuff for experimenting with viscous-damped
> high-quality phono tonearms. The damping fluid is used to stabilize the
> arm/cartridge.
>
> It would be cool to smear silicone fluid on the Panasonic's ribbon. The
> only problem is that Panasonic was an early practitioner of the
> "consumables racket." Consumer Reports could be counted on to fall for
> that one (I wonder if they still do). The ribbons are incredibly short
> and thin, so you go through them at a rapid clip -- there was no
> dispensation about price, either. Typically, when you got the bright
> idea to have a go at re-inking the ribbon, the damn thing was beginning
> to shred. Epson would have been a better investment, but there was a
> certain matter about the shrieking noise (remember?).
>
> About the dot printer: it feels like a sturdy old friend; I can't bear
> (bare) to throw it out. But then, I've still got that Olympia (Nakajima)
> interfaced typewriter. It's a beaut (sigh!).
>
> Thanks for the comment.
>
> Richard

 
 

Thread Tools
Display Modes



< Home - Windows Help - MS Office Help - Hardware Support >


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 08:30 AM.


vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO
Copyright © 2005-2013, TechTalkz.com. All Rights Reserved - Privacy Policy
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional